Fw: Hot Topics at The Body’s “Ask the Experts” Forums

From: “News at The Body” <update@news.thebody.com>
Date: 24 May 2011 16:26:35 -0400
To: <nelsonvergel@yahoo.com>
ReplyTo: “News at The Body” <update@news.thebody.com>
Subject: Hot Topics at The Body’s “Ask the Experts” Forums

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May 24, 2011 Visit the Forums “Hot Topics” Library Change/Update Subscription



LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
 How Can I Deal With All the Issues Surrounding Living With HIV?
I’m a 41-year-old man and I’ve been HIV positive for about 11 years. My HIV meds are Isentress (raltegravir) and Truvada (tenofovir/FTC). I also take Lyrica (pregabalin) and methadone because I suffer from pretty bad neuropathy, but these medications are no longer effective. My prescription copays have all gone up — now I can’t afford meds, and I make too much money to be eligible for any type of assistance. I’m just so tired of all these hurdles; I’m tempted to just let the virus run its course. I can’t go to therapy, but I do take a small dose of Prozac (fluoxetine) which helps a little. What else do you suggest to help me keep on living?

David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., responds in the “Mental Health and HIV” forum

 First Time With Benefits: What Should I Know About Health Insurance Eligibility?
I was diagnosed HIV positive a year ago. During that time I’ve been outside the U.S., but I just accepted a university teaching position in the States and will be heading back. This will be the first time I’ve ever had medical insurance through a job. I know I don’t need to disclose my HIV status to the insurance company or the job, and they can’t deny me coverage, but what should I know about pre-existing condition clauses and such? And can administrators disclose my status to my employer? Basically, what are the rules?

Lynn Franzoi responds in the “Workplace and Insurance Issues” forum
MIXED-STATUS COUPLES
 I Want to Marry My Poz Partner: How Do I Convince My Family It’s a Good Idea?
I’m a 27-year-old male medical doctor currently in a relationship with an HIV-positive nurse. We’ve been together for more than a year and are really in love. We’ve had amazing protected sex for that period and are both comfortable with it. I want to be with this person for the rest of my life, but how do I convince my parents and relatives that my partner is the one for me?

Robert J. Frascino, M.D., responds in the “Safe Sex and HIV Prevention” forum

Advertisement  HIV and Heart Disease
Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death in HIV patients. Visit www.HIVandYourHeart.org to make changes to improve your heart health and overall wellness. You can live a longer, stronger life with HIV and keep your heart healthy, too. Did you know people living with HIV often share some common issues that affect cardiovascular health? They include higher triglyceride levels, not enough good cholesterol, chronic inflammation, smoking, atherosclerosis, kidney failure and diabetes.

Also Worth Noting: Visual AIDS
Image from the May 2011 Visual AIDS Web Gallery
“Self Portrait as Case Study (Detail),” 1994; Frank Green

Visit the May 2011 Visual AIDS Web Gallery to view our latest collection of art by HIV-positive artists! This month’s gallery, entitled "Personal, Jesus," is curated by Matthew Lawrence.

HIV/AIDS TREATMENT
 Which HIV Drug Regimens Are Most Commonly Recommended for People Starting Treatment?
I was diagnosed HIV positive two months ago. Apparently I was infected about three or four years ago. Which are the best medications to treat this frightening disease?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum

 Will Sustiva Side Effects Eventually Subside?
I’ve been on Sustiva (efavirenz, Stocrin) for a month and I work mostly at night. Will my side effects — including nightmares and not being able to think straight — ever stop?

David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., responds in the “Mental Health and HIV” forum

 Can I Drink Alcohol While Taking Experimental HIV Meds?
I’m a moderate drinker (one or two drinks per day, with dinner or out with friends) and I just started on a regimen of Epzicom (abacavir/3TC, Kivexa) and GSK-572, an experimental integrase inhibitor. I’ve read about interactions between alcohol and some drugs. Do you think I should completely cut drinking out of my life while I’m part of this clinical trial?

Mark Holodniy, M.D., F.A.C.P., C.I.C., responds in the “Understanding Your Labs” forum
OTHER HEALTH ISSUES & HIV/AIDS
 What Could Be Causing My Chronic Pain?
I’ve known I’m HIV positive since 1990 though I believe I became positive in the early ’80s. I’ve always been very athletic, and it’s always been hard for me to gain or maintain weight. I’ve tried testosterone and steroid injections, patches and pills, and I’m now trying to get hold of the growth hormone Serostim. I’ve run into a wall with my workouts recently because I’m always in pain. Just stretching can make me sore for days, and the recuperation time is much longer than it’s ever been. What could be causing this condition?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum

 Can People Living With HIV Take Diet Pills?
What are the risks involved with HIV-positive people taking pills to lose weight? What are some other ways to control our weight?

David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., responds in the “Mental Health and HIV” forum
Connect With Others Recently Diagnosed With HIV: What Now?
(A recent post from the "Gay Men" board)

Just diagnosed three and a half weeks ago and I am not quite sure how to move forward. I am feeling well at the moment and have a CD4 count near 500 so my ID doc wants to wait a bit before starting treatment. My issue is how this illness is consuming my life. I am having trouble sleeping, concentrating at work, and am avoiding any social interaction … My partner and I were diagnosed at the same time and his health is not quite as strong as mine. … My entire existence seems to revolve around seeing to his needs and worrying about his levels and general health, all to my detriment. … I have told one friend who has been incredibly supportive but also admonished me to not be too selfish when thinking about my condition as it affects millions of people … I know he is right but at this moment all I want to do is cry. … Does this sound familiar to anyone? — Zach

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UNDERSTANDING HIV/AIDS LABS
 Is It Possible to Have a Low CD4 Count and an Undetectable Viral Load?
I started taking HIV meds in September 2010 with a CD4 count of 3. After six months on treatment my viral load was undetectable but my CD4 count was only 92. Is this normal?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum
HIV TRANSMISSION
 Confused Dosage of PEP: Is the Treatment Now Worthless?
A condom was left inside me after my HIV-positive partner came. He retrieved it quite easily, and after eight hours I started PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) medication: one blue Truvada (tenofovir/FTC) tablet in the evening and two yellow Kaletra (lopinavir/ritonavir) tablets twice a day. However, in my panic I got the dosing wrong and took only one Kaletra tablet instead of two in the morning and evening for the first five days. Other than that I’ve religiously taken the doses correctly, and I finish in three days. Will the treatment not work because of my error?

Robert J. Frascino, M.D., responds in the “Safe Sex and HIV Prevention” forum

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Activist Central
 Call to Action: Sign a Petition to Support Youth Participation in Global HIV/AIDS Decision-Making

 Action Alert: Condemn NY Post for Revealing Strauss-Kahn Victim Lives in AIDS Housing

 Join June 8 NYC Rally at Critical UN Meeting on HIV/AIDS

 Tell Washington, D.C., to Fully Fund ADAP and Other HIV/AIDS Programs to Prevent Needless Deaths

 NMAC’s ADAP Action Campaign: Get Free Flip Video Camera to Collect Stories

THE FAIR PRICING COALITION EXPRESSES DISMAY AT THE PRICE OF MERCK’S NEWLY APPROVED HEPATITIS C DRUG

May 17, 2011—On May 13, 2011, the FDA approved Merck’s Victrelis (boceprevir), the first new drug for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to come to market in almost ten years. The United States Department of Health and Human Services estimates that there are between 2.7 to 3.9 million people in the United States living with HCV and that approximately 20,000 people are newly infected with HCV every year.

“While this new drug approval is a very exciting development for the HCV community, the Fair Pricing Coalition (FPC) is very disappointed at the price set by Merck for Victrelis,” said FPC member Lynda Dee. “The FPC is concerned that the exorbitant wholesale acquisition cost (WAC) of $1,100 per week will adversely affect the ability of people with HCV to access Victrelis and that it will also set an excessively unreasonable future price point for the many HCV drugs in the pipeline. You can bet that no future HCV drugs will be priced less than Victrelis. This is a very bad start.”

Victrelis is a drug from the protease inhibitor family that is relatively easy and uncomplicated to make. “We understand that drug development costs a lot of money, but there is no reason for a drug from the protease inhibitor class to be so expensive,” said Dee.

Two other drugs, pegylated interferon and ribavirin must be taken with Victrelis, and the WAC price for HCV treatment with these two drugs is approximately $30,000. The FDA label recommends that Victrelis be taken with pegylated interferon and ribavirin for either 24, 32 or 48 weeks, depending on a patient’s response to the regimen. The WAC price for Victrelis is $26,400 for 24 weeks, $35,200 for 32 weeks and $48,400 for 48 weeks of treatment.

“These amounts added to the already high $30,000 cost of pegylated interferon and ribavirin make the cost of the new Victrelis containing regimen astronomical,” said Dee. “Although the addition of Victrelis to pegylated interferon and ribavirin should significantly increase the HCV cure rate, it will be impossible to sustain these prices in light of the current US healthcare crisis.”

“The HCV community is anxiously awaiting interferon-sparing regimens because of the terrible side effects caused by interferon as well as ribavirin,” said FPC member Murray Penner. “An encouraging number of these drugs are currently in development. It will take three and maybe even four of these new drugs in a combination regimen to effectively cure HCV in the future. Future HCV drugs will invariably be more expensive than Victrelis. If each of the new drugs costs approximately $50,000, we are looking at regimens that will ultimately cost between $150,000 and $200,000 in the very near future. This is unsustainable and will unacceptably limit access to the regimens.”

A recent paper presented at the American Society of Liver Diseases conference indicates that there will be a 30% increase in the cost of treating side effects caused by use of the new HCV protease inhibitor drugs. “These increased costs must also be considered in the equation,” said Penner. “Many people with HIV are also co-infected with HCV,” said Bill Arnold of the FPC. “The cost of HIV drugs which must be taken over the entire course of a patient’s life, plus a course of this new HCV treatment is unreasonably excessive. At this time, there are over 8,100 people on waiting lists for federally funded AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs). I am very concerned that these people will never gain access to promising new HCV therapies. Many may die as a result.”

Many individuals with HCV also have other medical conditions such as diabetes and bleeding disorders, and people with bleeding disorders pay as much as $150,000 each year for their clotting factor drugs alone. While many do have private insurance, the cost of co-pays and caps on insurance coverage may make these promising new therapies unaffordable for many people with private insurance, resulting in the inability of even people with insurance to access promising new HCV therapies.

“We are very disappointed by the cost set by Merck for Victrelis and are even more concerned that Vertex’s Incivek (telapravir) which will probably be approved by the FDA later this month may be even more expensive,” said Dee. “How will this all end? We fear it will end in a lack of patient access to promising new HCV treatments that will result in morbidity and mortality for hundreds of thousands of Americans.

“Both Merck and Vertex have pledged to make their new drugs available to patients who cannot afford these exorbitant prices through their co-pay and patient assistance programs,” Dee pointed out. “The FPC will continue to advocate for people with HCV to ensure that both companies keep their word. We have kept a tight watch on HIV drug manufacturers in this regard. We intend to do the same thing in the viral hepatitis arena.”
http://fairpricingcoalition.org/

Chicago: “Promising Advances in HIV Cure and Healthy Aging Research” on Tuesday, May 31 from 6:30-8 pm

I hope to see anyone living in Chicago in this lecture!

Read the last two paragraphs for details.

When AIDS service providers talk about condom campaigns and safer sex, most people assume they’re not talking to Chicago seniors. But if experts have it right, they need to start.HIV infection rates among Illinois seniors are climbing, advocates say. But unlike other at-risk groups, seniors present unique challenges in battling the disease, not the least of which is a stigma around sex and older adults that often silences that trend in both the media and in doctors’ offices.
“Folks often times overlook the fact that older adults are still having sex,” said Hope Barrett, senior director of public programs at the Center on Halsted. “Sexuality is a lifetime thing. You don’t stop being sexual at 30.”
According to 2009 Illinois Department of Public Health records, more than 10,000 people over age 50 are living with HIV/AIDS in Illinois. That’s not just because the generation hit hardest by AIDS is aging; 15% of that figure is new infections, reported between just 2005-2009.
That trend increasingly concerns Chicago AIDS service providers and is the subject a new film produced by Center on Halsted, Aging POZitively. The documentary, which premiers May 23 at Center on Halsted, follows three people who contracted HIV after age 50.
“It was incredibly challenging to find folks who would come forward to be a part of the film,” said Barrett, noting that most seniors shied away from sharing their HIV statuses. The film also explores the rising rate of infections among older adults as well as the challenges facing HIV-positive seniors.
Those challenges are myriad, said Dr. Magda Houlberg, a geriatrician who specializes in HIV care at Howard Brown Health Center. Many seniors don’t find out they are positive until much later than young people because HIV symptoms can easily be mistaken for signs of aging, like fatigue, depression, and a host of age-related illnesses. Further, other medications can complicate anti-HIV regimens. Those issues also make older adults undesirable to HIV researchers because they can cloud study results.
“Most research in terms of drug treatment for HIV is for people under 50,” Dr. Houlberg said. “So most information we have is just from what we’re seeing [ among patients ] .”
Houlberg also believes that HIV rates among older adults might be higher than statistics suggest because few physicians encourage them to get HIV tests.
“The medical community is so uncomfortable with sexuality in general, but with older adults they’re especially uncomfortable,” Houlberg said. “Some older adults do get offended when you broach the subject. It’s almost like you’re accusing someone of having risk behavior.”
The U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( CDC ) recommends that physicians talk about HIV with patients under age 65, but the advent of performance-enhancing drugs like Viagra and the fact that people are living longer has meant that more people are having sex later in life.
Some of those people were already married or partnered adults when the AIDS epidemic broke out and may have aged without seeing themselves as susceptible to the disease. Many who are widows or recent divorcees are negotiating safer-sex for the first time, said Hope Barrett.
However, people who lived through the onset of AIDS may also be at heightened risk. Modesto Tico Valle, CEO at Center on Halsted, said that some elders who are HIV-positive “assume everyone is HIV-positive,” and therefore fail to communicate their statuses to sexual partners.
Both causes raise questions for local service providers about how to reach elders. Targeted efforts tend to focus on youth and gay men, making it harder for elders to see themselves in HIV prevention messages.
HIV is often passed between generations, however. Valle said that youth and elders who are sexually involved sometimes struggle to negotiate safe sex because partners don’t know how to communicate about safe sex in the same ways.
Rising infection rates among Illinois seniors follow a national trend. CDC statistics suggest that HIV rates among people over 50 have been on the rise for more than a decade. AIDS diagnoses in that group tripled between 2001-2005, from 1% of seniors infected to 3%.
Daniel Montoya, deputy executive director of the National Minority AIDS Council, said that until seniors are screened regularly for HIV, service providers won’t have the data to prioritize prevention among that age category.
Finally, national AIDS organizations have been hard-hit by recession funding cuts, and many are struggling simply to maintain programs that already exist. A campaign directed at prevention among seniors might be a far-fetched idea.
Overwhelmingly, Chicago service providers seem to agree that unless the stigmatization around elders and sex is confronted, the trend will continue. But in Chicago, Juan Calderon, executive director of Humboldt Park-based Vida/SIDA, wants to take that analysis a step further. He is seeking greater commitment from Illinois officials to funding HIV prevention beyond just North Side organizations. He said his organization is ready to fight HIV among seniors, but that Vida/SIDA and other West and South Side groups will need more money.
“I think [ seniors and HIV ] is a citywide problem,” he said. “We do work with seniors, but we have the challenges of not enough funding. … The Department of Public Health needs to strengthen its approach, and Vida/SIDA will be ready when they do.”

The documentary, “Aging Pozitively,” premieres at Center on Halsted May 23 at 6:30 p.m. The event is free and will include a brief reception. More information is available at www.centeronhalsted.org .

Test Positive Aware Network, Positively Aware magazine and Center on Halsted are co-sponsoring a community event on “Promising Advances in HIV Cure and Healthy Aging Research” on Tuesday, May 31 from 6:30-8 pm. The free event, featuring popular lecturer, author and HIV advocate Nelson Vergel, will take place at the Center’s Hoover-Leppen Theatre at 3656 N. Halsted.
Since learning he was HIV-positive in 1986, Nelson Vergel has become a leading advocate for sports nutrition and HIV wellness. He is author of the book Testosterone: A Man’s Guide, and is co-author of Built to Survive. Nelson is the founder of the non-profit organizations Body Positive Wellness Clinic and Program for Wellness Restoration. He’s also the nutrition and exercise forum expert for TheBody.com and moderator for PozHealth, one of the largest HIV health discussion listserves in the U.S.
The event is free but seating is limited. To RSVP call 773-989-9400 or e-mail tpan@tpan.com .

Men’s health lecture in New York on May 24

For those who could not attend this lecture, here are a few available online:
To stay updated, register on Nelson Vergel’s new men’s health site that covers information on testosterone replacement, erectile function, sex drive, HCG, anastrozole, nutrition, supplements, exercise, and much more

HIV and nanotechnology: Workshop report i-base.info

Given the potential advantage of providing reduced toxicity, more durable formulations with improved pharmacokinetics (ie targeting macrophages to increase concentrations in lymph tissue and dramatically extending half-life and dosing intervals) and at a reduced cost makes it frustrating that so far none of these formulations has yet progressed to human studies.

A must read!

http://i-base.info/htb/14934

Fw: Hot Topics at The Body’s “Ask the Experts” Forums

From: “News at The Body” <update@news.thebody.com>
Date: 10 May 2011 17:33:51 -0400
To: <powertx@aol.com>
ReplyTo: “News at The Body” <update@news.thebody.com>
Subject: Hot Topics at The Body’s “Ask the Experts” Forums

If you have trouble reading this e-mail, you can see the online version at: www.thebody.com/topics.html

May 10, 2011 Visit the Forums “Hot Topics” Library Change/Update Subscription



LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS
 Where on My Body Should I Apply Testosterone Gels?
I’ve read in this forum that testosterone gel is best absorbed by areas of the body where there is less fat. I’ve been applying Androgel to my stomach, upper arms and shoulders as instructed by the manufacturer. Should I be applying it to other areas of my body instead, such as my shin, ankle and/or the top of my foot?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum

 Will a Vaporizer Eliminate the Dangers of Marijuana Use?
I was diagnosed HIV positive in April 2009 and started on Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC) a month later. My CD4 count hovers around the low 500s and my viral load is undetectable. I barely drink alcohol and don’t smoke cigarettes, but I do smoke pot two to four times a week after work. I did some research and found that the negative effects of marijuana really come from the smoke. I bought a vaporizer that heats up the marijuana to a temperature where there’s no combustion and therefore no smoke. I’m really happy with it, but what are your thoughts on this method of consuming pot?

David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., responds in the “Substance Use and HIV” forum
MIXED-STATUS COUPLES
 My Partner Was Recently Diagnosed: How Do I Keep Myself Safe?
I found out 24 hours ago that my girlfriend of six months, whom I love dearly, is HIV positive. She’s taking meds and has a low viral load. We used condoms for most of the relationship but there have been a few occasions where we had unprotected sex. If my test results come back negative, how do I maintain a sexual relationship with her and keep myself from becoming HIV positive?

David Fawcett, Ph.D., L.C.S.W., responds in the “Mental Health and HIV” forum
summertime: a season for hiv retreats!
lodge cliff “It might sound odd to seek out a vacation event just for people with HIV,” comments TheBody.com’s video blogger Mark S. King. He’s participated in HIV retreats and found the experience so rewarding, he compiled a list of several fun options around the U.S. “Joining a group of others living with HIV might be a fun solution if you’re looking to make friends with other people living with HIV and build your support network.”

Retreats range from carefree holidays off the beaten track to educational weekends in the middle of the biggest U.S. cities. Many retreats are free, low-cost or provide discounts to people in need. Check out Mark’s article, as well as TheBody.com’s retreat resource page!


HIV/AIDS TREATMENT
 Are There Any Interactions Between My HIV Meds and the Supplements I Take?
I’ve been on Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC) for the past 15 months and have had great results so far. I started a new fitness regimen recently. Along with jogging and a healthy diet, I’m taking Coenzyme Q10, cod liver oil capsules and a multivitamin tablet. Do you have any information about possible negative interactions between these supplements and my HIV medications?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum

 What’s the “Danger” in the K103N Mutation?
My CD4 count has consistently been around 700 and my viral load is around 9,000. In a huge error I was given Sustiva (efavirenz, Stocrin) monotherapy (no other drugs in my regimen), and I learned I had the K103N mutation. I was told it wasn’t that big a deal — it just meant I couldn’t take Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC). However, I keep reading things like “dangerous K103N mutation.” Is there more to be concerned about with this mutation than I was told — simply losing a class of HIV meds?

Robert J. Frascino, M.D., responds in the “Fatigue and Anemia” forum

 Are Swollen Glands a Side Effect of My HIV Meds?
I started taking Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC) just over two months ago. Prior to starting treatment I never had any symptoms of HIV (including during seroconversion), my CD4 count was 410, my CD4 percentage was 34 and my viral load was 13,000. Since starting Atripla the glands in my neck have been swollen and I have a dull ache in my upper left abdomen. Is all this normal? Should I be concerned?

Keith Henry, M.D., responds in the “Managing Side Effects of HIV Treatment” forum
OTHER HEALTH ISSUES & HIV/AIDS
 Is My Heart Condition Related to Long-Term HIV Survival?
I’m a male 22-year HIV survivor and I’ve recently been having episodes of atrial fibrillation (A-Fib). My primary infectious disease doctor told me that cardiac complications such as A-Fib are turning out to be a main risk factor for those who are long-term HIV survivors. I was warned to back way off the stress, improve my diet, lower the bad cholesterol, and increase the good cholesterol and exercise. Have you heard of this connection between heart issues and long-term HIV? What are some other factors behind cardiac complications, and what more can I do about my bouts with A-Fib?

Keith Henry, M.D., responds in the “Managing Side Effects of HIV Treatment” forum

 Will I Be Able to Swallow My Meds After I Have My Tonsils Out?
I’ll be having a tonsillectomy next month due to chronic tonsillitis. I’ve been taking Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC) for more than a year and have had absolutely no side effects. My viral load is undetectable and my CD4 count is in the 500s. Will I be able to swallow my Atripla after surgery?

Benjamin Young, M.D., Ph.D., responds in the “Choosing Your Meds” forum
Connect With Others Daughter Is 15, May Be Pregnant and Isn’t Worried About HIV: What Can a Poz Dad Do?
(A recent post from the "Living With HIV" board)

Happy Mother’s Day, everyone. A while back my daughter and I had the sit-down conversation about sex. She can see through my trials in life what HIV is and the toll I pay trying to live with it, but now I feel she didn’t hear a single thing I said. She’s been sneaking around and having unprotected sex with guys older than her, and skipping school to do it. … I’m just worried she will be in this spot for doing just the only thing I ever asked my kids not to do. I feel responsible for her not being fazed by HIV. She sees all I do is take tons of pills and I’m still alive. Is this disease becoming so common it’s not threatening? My daughter’s 15, worried about being pregnant, and doesn’t care. Did I do something wrong in this situation? — alive2

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UNDERSTANDING HIV/AIDS LABS
 Why Isn’t My CD4 Count Higher at This Point?
I was diagnosed with HIV two years ago with a CD4 count of 41 and a viral load of 70,000. I was 26. I started taking Atripla (efavirenz/tenofovir/FTC) and within two weeks my CD4 count increased to 70. Within six months it went up to 130. It took me two years just to reach 200, but lately I’ve noticed that it’s not increasing at all. It even went down once, though then it increased again. My viral load has remained undetectable. I really like Atripla because it’s not causing many side effects, but should I change meds for a CD4 count increase?

Nelson Vergel responds in the “Nutrition and Exercise” forum HIV TRANSMISSION
 Is Washing Up With Clorox a Good Idea to Prevent HIV Transmission?
I recently had unprotected intercourse with someone I’d just met outside a bar. Upon realizing how foolishly I had just behaved, I quickly excused myself to the bathroom. I found some of those Clorox bathroom cleaning wipes (whose can promises it kills 99.9% of germs), and a can of Oust air freshener. I rubbed my penis with the Clorox wipes, making sure to wring out enough fluid to pour down my urethra. I also sprayed One-Eyed Willie with the Oust. Because I ejaculated outside of my quickie partner’s body, could the “eruption” have been enough to clear my tube of HIV? Was my chemistry experiment in penile punishment unnecessary, or might I have saved myself from potential infection?

Robert J. Frascino, M.D., responds in the “Safe Sex and HIV Prevention” forum

Worried Your Spam Filter Might Trash Our Mailings? The Body’s e-mail updates are especially prone to being caught up in spam filters, since our newsletters tend to refer frequently to sex, drugs, the human anatomy and so forth.

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Activist Central
 NMAC’s ADAP Action Campaign: Get Free Flip Video Camera to Collect Stories

 Action Alert: On May 12, Make Big Banks and Millionaires Pay

 ACRIA Partners With New York Academy of Sciences for Educational Symposium on May 16

Fw: TheBodyPRO.com Newsletter: The Latest HIV/AIDS Research and News

From: “The Body PRO” <news@thebodypro.com>
Date: 10 May 2011 17:17:26 -0400
To: <powertx@aol.com>
ReplyTo: “The Body PRO” <news@thebodypro.com>
Subject: TheBodyPRO.com Newsletter: The Latest HIV/AIDS Research and News

If you have trouble reading this e-mail, you can read the online version at: www.thebodypro.com/newsletter.html
 
Welcome to The Body PRO Newsletter, a bi-weekly review of the latest breaking news and research in HIV medicine, aimed specifically at informing health care professionals.
May 10, 2011
In This Newsletter:

•  HIV CARE TODAY
HIV Care Today is a multi-author blog featuring people on the frontlines of HIV treatment, prevention and patient/client care. This blog serves as a platform for health care professionals to discuss the everyday challenges of their jobs, recent developments in their fields and issues relevant to the evolution of HIV/AIDS care.

Nelson VergelNelson Vergel: Is There a Future for HIV-Infected Patients in “Deep Salvage”?
Despite the development of ever-more-effective antiretrovirals and HAART regimens, there remains a subset of patients for whom antiretroviral therapy fails. And fails again, and yet again, ultimately leading to extensive drug resistance and a critical clinical conundrum. Nelson Vergel, B.S.Ch.E., examines recent epidemiological and clinical findings regarding this hard-to-treat population.

Bethsheba JohnsonBethsheba Johnson: Where Are the Clinical Trials That Focus on HIV-Affected Women?
“As I look back over the recent past in HIV research, I am impressed at what advancements we have made, yet disturbed at what little we know and have done regarding HIV prevention and treatment in women,” Bethsheba Johnson, G.N.P.-B.C., A.A.H.I.V.S., writes. In her latest blog entry, she discusses the paucity of current HIV research involving largely female cohorts.
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Doctors: Tell the FDA: PrEP is “No Magic Pill”
Gilead Sciences Inc. is prematurely pushing to gain FDA approval to market Truvada as an HIV prevention pill — despite a low 44% effectiveness rate. According to a paper published by the American Journal of Public Health, more study is needed to ensure patient safety and the public’s health. Sign on NOW to an e-letter urging the FDA NOT to consider approval of Truvada as PrEP until further studies are completed.
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•  HIV TREATMENT & COMPLICATIONS
Initiating HAART at High CD4+ Cell Count Increases AIDS-Free Survival, Study Finds
Newly published results from a massive international study found that HIV-infected people who initiated antiretroviral therapy with a CD4+ cell count no lower than 500 had a reduced risk of progression to AIDS or death compared to people who did not commence treatment until their CD4+ cell count was 350 or lower.

Increased Risk of Bacterial Pneumonia Noted Among Patients Receiving Enfuvirtide
The drug label for enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) has been updated to include a warning that the drug may increase a patient’s risk for developing bacterial pneumonia. The warning stems from an observational study of 1,850 HIV-infected patients that found a 34% increased adjusted risk of pneumonia for patients receiving enfuvirtide compared to patients not receiving enfuvirtide.

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•  HIV NEWS & VIEWS
prison illustrationObstacles to Care and Quality of Life for HIV-Infected Inmates
As anyone who works with patients or clients in the U.S. prison system can attest, life as an inmate can be difficult enough as it is. But life as an inmate with HIV? Writing for the Canadian AIDS Treatment Information Exchange, David McLay and Ann Silversides provide a stark look inside the lives of HIV-infected people behind prison walls. (Illustration: Raymond Biesinger)

From Policy to Pregnancy: Sexual Rights and Reproductive Options for People Living With HIV/AIDS
In this series of articles from presentations delivered at the XVIII International AIDS Conference in Vienna, Austria, six prominent HIV advocates discuss the family-planning struggles women living with HIV/AIDS face in cultures ranging from the traditional to the technologically advanced.

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•  THE PATIENT PERSPECTIVE: FEATURED ON THEBODY.COM
quillPoetry Month at TheBody.com: HIV-Affected Readers Submit Their Work
To mark National Poetry Month in the U.S., throughout the month of April our readers at TheBody.com submitted original, creative works about living with, or being affected by, HIV/AIDS. This year’s submissions, which run the gamut of emotions — from exultation to despair and back again — are on our Poetry Month 2011 home page for you to peruse and digest.

momma montageWord on The Street: The Joys and Challenges of Motherhood
In honor of Mother’s Day on May 8, we asked mothers throughout the U.S. who are living with HIV/AIDS the following question: What is the greatest joy, and the greatest challenge, of being a mother to your children?

Justin B. Terry-SmithJustin B. Terry-Smith: 4 Ways Disclosure Has Helped Me
“Since getting diagnosed as HIV positive in 2006, I have made it a priority to be open about my status,” Justin B. Terry-Smith writes. And although at times that public disclosure has been difficult, on balance he feels his life is better for it. In his latest video blog entry, Justin outlines four ways his life has improved since he chose to be “out and proud” about his HIV status.

Autumn PresserThe First Few Months: A Transgender Woman Faces an HIV Diagnosis in the Rural U.S.
“I am a transgender woman living in rural Arkansas. I’m NOT, nor have I ever been, a sex worker, escort or anything of the sort. I don’t use IV drugs and I’m not promiscuous. Just the recipient of a s*** storm of bad luck,” writes Autumn Preusser. She started keeping an online journal several days after her diagnosis; in it, she candidly shares her experiences as she adjusts to life with HIV.
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•  HIV/STD TRANSMISSION
Update on Applying Recent MSM HIV Prevention Research (Video)
At this year’s Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in Boston, Gregorio Millett, a senior behavioral scientist from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, gave two presentations: “Responding to Risk Among U.S. MSM” and “Predictors of Being HIV Positive Unaware among Black and Latino MSM [men who have sex with men].” In this video, AIDS.gov director Miguel Lopez chats with Millett about his presentations and how HIV care providers in the U.S. can bolster their HIV prevention efforts.

A Closer Look at San Francisco’s New Approach to HIV Prevention
Given its long history of leading the way in HIV treatment and prevention, it’s no shock that San Francisco, Calif., is among the first U.S. cities to launch an aggressive campaign to follow through on the goals of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy. In this brief video from AIDS.gov, Grant Colfax, director of HIV Prevention and Research at the San Francisco Department of Public Health, shares key details of the city’s plan to reduce its HIV rates.

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Also Worth Noting

HIV Management Today In HIV Management Today, an informative online series from TheBodyPRO.com, we consult with some of the top clinical minds in HIV on some of the most important issues in HIV/AIDS clinical management.

•  Assessing and Acting on Cardiovascular Disease Risk in HIV-Infected Patients, featuring Marshall Glesby, M.D., Ph.D., and Jens Lundgren, M.D.

•  A Closer Look at Tesamorelin (Egrifta), a Newly Approved Treatment for HIV-Associated Lipohypertrophy, featuring Daniel Berger, M.D.

•  New Paradigms of First-Line HIV Therapy: Determining When (and With What) to Start, featuring Eric Daar, M.D., and Trevor Hawkins, M.D.

•  Clinical Management of the HIV-Infected Woman, featuring Kimberly Smith, M.D., M.P.H., and Valerie Stone, M.D., M.P.H.

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